Five Baltimore Men—Including Former Member of Baltimore Safe Streets Program—Facing Federal Indictment for Drug Trafficking Offenses | USAO-MD

Baltimore, Maryland – A federal grand jury has returned a superseding indictment charging four Baltimore men on the federal charge of conspiracy to distribute controlled substances, and a fifth man with possession with intent to distribute controlled substances, being a felon in possession of a firearm, and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.  The superseding indictment, which was returned on November 18, 2020, adds three new defendants and nine new counts.  Charged in the indictment are:

                        Ronald Alexander, age 50;
                        Mark Brinkley, age 51;
                        Thomas Corey Crosby, age 51;
                        Joseph McClean, age 49; and
                        Mark McCoy, age 53.

The indictment was announced by United States Attorney for the District of Maryland Robert K. Hur; Assistant Special Agent in Charge Orville O. Greene of the Drug Enforcement Administration, Baltimore District Office; and Commissioner Michael Harrison of the Baltimore Police Department.

According to the 10-count indictment, from at least May 2020 through August 14, 2020, Alexander, Brinkley, Crosby, and McClean conspired to distribute heroin, fentanyl, cocaine, and crack cocaine.  According to court documents, Alexander participated in the conspiracy while he was employed by the Safe Streets program in Baltimore City.  McClean allegedly distributed controlled substances, including fentanyl and heroin on five occasions between July 1 and July 30, 2020.  Brinkley allegedly possessed with the intent to distribute at least 100 grams of heroin, 40 grams of fentanyl, and cocaine.  Finally, on August 14, 2020, McCoy allegedly possessed a .40-caliber pistol in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime, specifically, possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine.  As stated in the superseding indictment, McCoy had a previous felony conviction and was prohibited from possessing a firearm.

If convicted, as a result of previous federal felony convictions, Alexander and Crosby face a mandatory minimum of 10 years in federal prison and a maximum sentence of life in prison for the drug conspiracy.  Brinkley and McClean each face a mandatory minimum of five years in federal prison and a maximum of 40 years in federal prison for the conspiracy.  McClean also faces a maximum of 20 years in federal prison for each of five counts of distribution of controlled substances.  Brinkley and McCoy face a maximum of 20 years in federal prison for possession with intent to distribute controlled substances, and McCoy also faces a maximum of 10 years in federal prison for being a felon in possession of a firearm.  Finally, as a result of a previous federal conviction on the same charge, McCoy faces a mandatory 25 years in prison, consecutive to any other sentence imposed, and up to life in prison, for possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.  Actual sentences for federal crimes are typically less than the maximum penalties and a federal district court judge will determine any sentence after taking into account the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.  An initial appearance in U.S. District Court in Baltimore has not yet been scheduled.  Alexander and Crosby remain detained.  Brinkley and McCoy are in state custody on related charges.

An indictment is not a finding of guilt.  An individual charged by indictment is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty at some later criminal proceedings. 

This case is part of an Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) investigation.  OCDETF identifies, disrupts, and dismantles the highest-level criminal organizations that threaten the United States using a prosecutor-led, intelligence-driven, multi-agency approach that leverages the strengths of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies against criminal networks.

United States Attorney Robert K. Hur commended the DEA and Baltimore Police Department for their work in the investigation.  Mr. Hur thanked Assistant U.S. Attorneys Matthew DellaBetta and Daniel A. Loveland, Jr., who are prosecuting the case.

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